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The Fleur de Lis Hotel

6-8 Delf Street, Sandwich, Kent, CT13 9BZ, United Kingdom
Self Assessed

About Sandwich

Sandwich was one of the Cinque Ports and still has many original medieval buildings, and gates in the old town walls, churches, almshouses and the White Mill. While once a major port, it is now two miles from the sea, its historic centre preserved.

Sandwich Bay is home to nature reserves and two world-class golf courses, Royal St George's and Prince's. The town is also home to educational and cultural events.

History of Sandwich

History of Sandwich

From being a Saxon stronghold first mentioned in AD664 to its role as a Cinque Port, Sandwich is richly woven with history and traditions. Sandwich is one of the most complete medieval towns in England. It contains the highest number of listed buildings per head of population in the country and was the first town in Britain to have a preservation order placed on the entire town. The street plan has changed little since the time of Doomsday in 1086 and some churches, houses and public buildings date back to the 13th Century. Situated near the beautiful Kent coast Sandwich is surrounded by a number of picturesque villages and gentle countryside.

Sandwich Quay

Sandwich Quay

Sandwich is approximately two miles from the sea, but the River Stour used to be large enough for big trading and war ships to sail to and from the quay. This large harbour was called Sandwich Haven. It was also large enough for invading ships, and the town was invaded many times in the past. For example, in 1457, the town was attacked by 4,000 Frenchmen (mainly from Honfleur) under Marshal Pierre de Breze or as English accounts call him, Peter Brassey. The Mayor of Sandwich, John Drury, was killed along with many citizens. In memory of this event, the Mayor of Sandwich still wears a black robe. The town of Honfleur is now a twin town of Sandwich. Sandwich was and still is a principle Cinque port. Originally, the Cinque Ports were a confederation of five harbours, Sandwich, Romney, Dover, Hythe, and Hastings. They supplied the Crown with ships and men for over 300 years. In return they received freedom from tolls and customs duties, freedom to trade and to hold their own judicial courts plus many other privileges. Today, these towns are still known as the Cinque Ports, but the coastline has changed considerably over the centuries and only Dover retains its major port status.

 
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